American Detective

Behind the Scenes of Famous Criminal Investigations

Thomas A Reppetto

Reppetto offers a behind-the-scenes look at some of the most famous cases during the era of detectives. He proposes a return of the detective as the primary force of the police department and a change in police policy, calling for "community policing."
Publication date:
June 2018
Publisher :
Potomac Books, Inc.
Language:
English
Illustration :
20 photographs
Format Available     Quantity Price
Hardback
ISBN : 9781640120228

Dimensions : 230 X 150 cm
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£28.99

Overview
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• Addresses the 21st Century's public unrest with the structure of police departments
• Proposes an alternate method of policing that would reinstate detectives in central roles, a method called "community policing”
• Offers a behind-the-scenes look at famous crimes of the 20th Century, including the Lindbergh kidnapping in New Jersey, the Brinks robbery in Boston, the murder of the Black Dahlia in L.A., and the Kennedy assassination
• Reppetto profiles famous sleuths such as private detective chiefs Allan Pinkerton and William Burns, top commanders like Thad Brown of L.A., public safety director Elliott Ness of Cleveland, and America's "top cop” J. Edgar Hoover of the FBI

From 1920 to 1970, detectives were the dominant force in American urban police departments. In American Detective, Thomas A. Reppetto examines detective bureaus rather than just individual detectives. Each chapter offers a behind-the-scenes look at detective bureaus, embryonic or fully formed, in New York, New Jersey, Los Angeles, Chicago, Cleveland, San Francisco, and Boston, the FBI and the Texas Rangers. From grisly murders to high-stake heists, political crimes to high-profile kidnappings, Reppetto takes readers on a journey through criminal justice history in the United States and shows how detectives played a major role in each case. Beginning with the invention of the detective in the mid-nineteenth century, Reppetto profiles famous sleuths throughout time, such as private detective chiefs Allan Pinkerton and William Burns, top commanders like Thad Brown of L.A., public safety director Elliott Ness of Cleveland, and America's "top cop” J. Edgar Hoover of the FBI, to name a few. Detectives were the city's watchdog before the entire police department took over in the late 19th century to make the city "safe.” A solid case for the reinstatement of detectives' original primary function in police departments, Reppetto's book shatters the present-day policing system we take for granted.