Cheated

The UNC Scandal, the Education of Athletes, and the Future of Big-Time College Sports

Jay M Smith, Mary Willingham

Told from the vantage point of two insiders with a privileged perspective on the individuals and events involved, Cheated examines athletic-academic corruption at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and in NCAA athletics.
Publication date:
November 2019
Publisher :
Potomac Books, Inc.
Language:
English
Format Available     Quantity Price
Paperback
ISBN : 9781640122468

Dimensions : 228 X 152 mm
-
+
£14.99

Overview
-

• Told from the vantage point of two insiders with a privileged perspective on the individuals and events involved
• Examines athletic-academic corruption at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and in NCAA athletics

In 2010 allegations of an utterly corrupt academic system for student-athletes emerged from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill campus, home of the legendary Tar Heels. As the alma mater of Michael Jordan, Marion Jones, Lawrence Taylor, Rashad McCants, and many others, the winner of forty national championships in six different sports, and a partner in one of the best rivalries in sports, UNC-Chapel Hill is a world famous colossus of college athletics. Yet for almost twenty years, from 1993 to 2011, UNC prioritized sports over academics by allowing athletes to enroll in and earn high grades for nonexistent classes, letting athletics at the school undermine and corrupt its mission of truth, discovery, and free inquiry. Written by UNC professor of history Jay Smith and UNC athletics department whistleblower Mary Willingham, Cheated exposes the fraudulent inner workings of this famous university. For decades these internal systems have allowed woefully underprepared basketball and football players to take fake courses and earn devalued degrees from one of the nation's top universities while faculty and administrators looked the other way. In unbiased and carefully sourced detail, Cheated recounts the academic fraud in UNC's athletics department, even as university leaders focused on minimizing the damage in order to keep the billion-dollar college sports revenue machine functioning. Smith and Willingham make an impassioned argument that the "student-athletes” in these programs are being cheated out of what, after all, is promised them in the first place: a college education. Updated with a new epilogue, Cheated carries the narrative through the dramatic and defining events of 2017 including the landmark Wainstein report, the findings of which UNC leaders initially embraced, only to push it aside in an audacious strategy of denial with the NCAA. UNC resisted owning up to its failure and called the NCAA's bluff, ultimately escaping punishment for offering sham coursework. Finally, the epilogue also covers the lengths UNC administrators went to in order to prevent critical discussion of the scandal in UNC classrooms. The ongoing fallout from this scandal—and the continuing spotlight on the failings of college athletics, which are hardly unique to UNC—has continued to inform the debate about how the $16 billion college sports industry operates and has influence on college campuses nationwide.