Fight Like The Devil

The First Day at Gettysberg

Chris Mackowski

Do not bring on a general engagement, Confederate General Robert E. Lee warned his commanders. The Army of Northern Virginia, slicing its way through south-central Pennsylvania, was too spread out, too vulnerable, for a full-scale engagement with its old nemesis, the Army of the Potomac.
Publication date:
July 2015
Publisher :
Savas Beatie
Language:
English
Series :
Emerging Civil War Series
Illustration :
150 images 14 maps
Format Available     Quantity Price
Paperback
ISBN : 9781611212273

Dimensions : 229 X 152 mm
-
+
This book is temporarily out of stock.
£8.99
Also available as an ebook:
Buy From Amazon Amazon
Buy From Apple Apple
Buy From Barnes and Noble Barnes & Noble
Buy From Kobo Kobo

Casemate will earn a small commission if you buy an ebook after clicking a link here

Overview
-

Do not bring on a general engagement, Confederate General Robert E. Lee warned his commanders. The Army of Northern Virginia, slicing its way through south-central Pennsylvania, was too spread out, too vulnerable, for a full-scale engagement with its old nemesis, the Army of the Potomac. Too much was riding on this latest Confederate invasion of the North. Too much was at stake.

As Confederate forces groped their way through the mountain passes, a chance encounter with Federal cavalry on the outskirts of a small Pennsylvania crossroads town triggered a series of events that quickly escalated beyond Lee’s—or anyone’s—control. Waves of soldiers materialized on both sides in a constantly shifting jigsaw of combat. “You will have to fight like the devil . . .” one Union cavalryman predicted.

The costliest battle in the history of the North American continent had begun.

July 1, 1863 remains the most overlooked phase of the battle of Gettysburg, yet it set the stage for all the fateful events that followed.

Bringing decades of familiarity to the discussion, historians Chris Mackowski and Daniel T. Davis, in their always-engaging style, recount the action of that first day of battle and explore the profound implications in Fight Like the Devil.


REVIEWS

The book also benefits from looking at the events of the first day of the battle as being important in their own right, and not simply as the build-up to the more famous struggles of the second and third days. The text is supported by good clear maps, and by an impressive selection of contemporary and near contemporary photographs, which give a good feel for how the battlefield looked at the time, before it became a vast battlefield park.
History of War