Jonathan Wateridge – Enclave/Expatria

Jonathan Wateridge, Gilda Williams, Mark Sanders

Through his beautiful and disconcerting works depicting carefree sunny days beside exclusive suburban pools, Lusaka-born, Britain-based painter Jonathan Wateridge (b.1972) revisits his own childhood in post-independence Zambia in the 1970s and '80s, exploring issues of White privilege and Black disenfranchisement in post-colonial Africa.
Publication date:
June 2019
Publisher :
Anomie Publishing
Editor :
Mark Sanders
Language:
English
Illustration :
130
Format Available     Quantity Price
Hardback
ISBN : 9781910221211

Dimensions : 290 X 245 mm
-
+
This book is temporarily out of stock.
£40.00

Overview
-

• First trade monograph on the work of Norfolk-based painter Jonathan Wateridge (b.1972, Lusaka, Zambia)
• Documentation of two major bodies of work by the artist, ‘Enclave' and ‘Expatria'.

Features an essay by academic and critic Dr Gilda Williams, and an essay by the editor of the monograph, independent curator, writer and art consultant Mark Sanders
• A 200-page monograph that is essential reading for those passionate about contemporary painting, and which makes a valuable contribution to discussion of the post-colonial condition in the visual arts

Jonathan Wateridge was born in Lusaka, Zambia, in 1972. Today he lives and works in Norfolk, UK. This, the artist's first trade monograph, presents two significant bodies of work, ‘Enclave' and ‘Expatria'. In these series, Wateridge returns to his childhood memories of growing up within the privileged white ex-pat communities of Zambia in the 1970s and 1980s, during the early years of the country's independence from British rule. ‘Having grown up in an apparent world of sunshine and suburban pools, I sought to overlap those aspects of my formative experiences with the wider issues of the West's post-colonial role,' Wateridge has stated. His recent paintings, produced with the artist's characteristic virtuosity and based on elaborate studio stage sets replete with a varied cast of actors, also seek to explore more lyrical figurative languages offered by the medium, adding to the uneasy dynamics that haunt these memorable and accomplished works.

This hardback monograph, designed by Peter B. Willberg, has been edited and authored by London-based independent curator, writer and art consultant Mark Sanders. The publication features an essay by Dr Gilda Williams, a London correspondent for Artforum who also teaches art writing on the MFA Curating programme at Goldsmiths College, University of London. Presenting over 130 paintings and details, this 200-page monograph is essential reading for anybody passionate about contemporary painting, and makes a valuable contribution to discussion of the post-colonial condition in the visual arts.