The Viaz’ma Catastrophe, 1941

The Red Army's Disastrous Stand against Operation Typhoon

Lev Lopukhovsky

This book describes one of the most terrible tragedies of the Second World War and the events preceding it. The horrible miscalculations made by the Stavka of the Soviet Supreme High Command and the Front commands led in October 1941 to the deaths and imprisonment of hundreds of thousands of their own people.
Publication date:
November 2012
Publisher :
Helion and Company
Language:
English
Format Available     Quantity Price
Hardback
ISBN : 9781908916501

Dimensions : 234 X 156 cm
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£55.00
eBook (ePub)
ISBN : 9781910294185

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£2.50
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Overview
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• The full picture of the Red Army's losses during the Second World War presented for the first time

This book describes one of the most terrible tragedies of the Second World War and the events preceding it. The horrible miscalculations made by the Stavka of the Soviet Supreme High Command and the Front commands led in October 1941 to the deaths and imprisonment of hundreds of thousands of their own people. Until recently, the magnitude of the defeats suffered by the Red Army at Viaz'ma and Briansk were simply kept hushed up. For the first time, in this book a full picture of the combat operations that led to this tragedy are laid out in detail, using previously unknown or little-used documents.

The author was driven to write this book after his long years of fruitless search to learn what happened to his father, Colonel N.I. Lopukhovsky, the commander of the 120th Howitzer Artillery Regiment, who disappeared together with his unit in the maelstrom of Operation Typhoon. He became determined to break the official silence surrounding the military disaster on the approaches to Moscow in the autumn of 1941.

In the present edition, the author additionally introduces documents from German military archives, which will doubtlessly interest not only scholars, but also students of the Eastern Front of the Second World War. Lopukhovsky substantiates his position on the matter of the true extent of the losses of the Red Army in men and equipment, which greatly exceeded the official data. In the Epilogue, he briefly discusses the searches he has conducted with the aim of revealing the circumstances surrounding the deaths of Soviet soldiers, who to this point have been listed among the missing-in-action - including his own father.

The narrative is enhanced by numerous photographs, colour maps and tables.

REVIEWS

“The level of detail is staggering and the accompanying maps and tables add a degree of clarity rarely enjoyed in a book of this complexity. Stuart Britton who has undertaken the translation of this book from its original Russian is to be commended for another outstanding endeavour… an outstanding book and a highly recommended addition to those seeking to expand their understanding of the challenges that the Soviet's struggled with in trying to contain the German Typhoon of 1941. It is a sobering and humbling rendition of the sacrifice of the Russian soldier and the dysfunction of their leadership.”
Global War Studies

Viaz'ma was the nadir of the Red Army's performance during Operation Barbarossa. Lopukhovsky's painstaking research in hitherto unavailable archival sources exposes weaknesses from the high command to the rifle platoons. The author demonstrates as well the structural weaknesses that underlay the USSR's military shortcomings, and he memorializes the soldiers whose blood paid for errors too long obscured by neglect and cover-ups.
Dennis Showalter, Colorado College, author of Armor and Blood: The Battle of Kursk, The Turning Point of World War I

Lopukhovsky's account of the battle of Viaz'ma is masterful. The sheer detail and expert analysis reflects the 41 years he spent researching and writing it.
David Stahel, author of Operation Typhoon: Hitler's March on Moscow, October 1941 and Kiev 1941.