War Flower

My Life after Iraq

Brooke King

A no-holds-barred account of the reality women face in the war, War Flower pushes back against the stereotypes about women in combat.
Publication date:
March 2019
Publisher :
Potomac Books, Inc.
Language:
English
Format Available     Quantity Price
Hardback
ISBN : 9781640121188

Dimensions : 228 X 152 mm
-
+
This book is available
£22.50

Overview
-

• Reveals an important side of the war that no one - certainly no woman - has ever revealed
• Pushes back against stereotypes of women in the military and in combat
• Demonstrates the legacy of violence in military families from a mother's perspective
• Presents the issues concerning PTSD from the perspective of a female combatant
• Blurbs from Brian Turner (My Life as a Foreign Country, 2014 and Here, Bullet, 2005) and Jesse Goolsby (I'd Walk with my Friends if I Could Find Them, 2016), who are both award-winning authors and creative writing professors

Brooke King has been asked over and over by interviewers what it's like to be a woman in combat, but the answer she gives is never exactly what the public wants to know. The answer they are seeking lies in the gory details of war—the sex, death, violence, and reality of it all—as she experienced it. In War Flower, King breaks her silence and finally reveals the truth about her experience as a soldier in Iraq. Find out what happens when the sex turns into secret affairs, the violence is turned up to 11, and the hate for a country she knew nothing about as a nineteen year old becomes that much more sickening to the thirty-year-old mother that writes it all out before her PTSD fades the memories into oblivion.

War Flower is a study of violence as it pertains to a girl that went to war and returned home a woman. By telling her truth, King examines what violence does to a woman and how inherited that violence can be when that woman becomes a mother. King's memoir is a meditation on the consequences of violence through generations and how a war zone, from either side of the battle, is inevitably intertwined with tragedy and the loss of one's self.